Light Therapy Explained

Light therapy is the process of using bright light to encourage natural processes within the body that are hindered due to the lack of light. The recommended amount of light output to be used for light therapy is a minimum of 10,000 lux at a distance of 12" from the light source. However, we have found that 5,000 lux used for a longer period of time is much more comfortable for the user and is just as effective. The use of full spectrum lighting is also crucial in preventing head aches and other side effects that are encounter through the use of inferior spectral output lamps.

Light therapy is typically used to treat seasonal mood disorders such as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), subsyndromal SAD, and symptoms caused by minor winter blues. Light therapy has also been shown to be effective for sleep phase disorders, circadian problems, and other disorders such as bi-polar disorder and ADD/ADHD attention deficit disorders. Light therapy is no miracle cure and can't be done while you sleep, etc. but rather is the simple process of providing enough light of the proper spectrum to the retina of the eye to cause hormonal shifts that are normal physiological changes of the human body as a response to daylight.